Book List

There are tons of books outthere and over the years Ihave compiled a list of over 2500+ books. But my trouble was always What to read next? So here is the collection of the books I believe everyone should read. I would love to discuss all of these books with anyone who have also read them, and to hear what you favorite book list.

As you will hopefully I love books that either change my false perception of things (like introverts, psychopaths, and Arnold Schwarzenegger) and books that help me become a better version of myself (like happiness, productivity and business). 

Of Human Freedom

How strongly I recommend it: 10/10

Greatest Lesson: All circumstances are neutral in nature. Whether it is perceived as good or bad is up to us, which means there lies opportunities in every circumstance. Keep in mind, Epictetus was born a slave.

Man's Search for Meaning

How strongly I recommend it: 10/10

Greatest Lesson: People with something to live for can withstand almost anything. Victor Frankl was a jewish psychologist, who survived concentration camps and turned his experience into a psychological experiment.

Siddhartha

How strongly I recommend it: 10/10

Greatest Lesson: If you can fast, wait and think, you are free. No one can force you with hunger, rush you into premature decisions, or convince you to do something you wouldn't otherwise have done. (There are so many more lessons in this book)

How to Achieve True Greatness

How strongly I recommend it: 9/10

Greatest Lesson: Beauty is supposed to be appreciated by the visual sense, not the physical one. This book is only a chapter in Baldesar Castiglione's Book of the Courtier.

The 4-Hour Workweek

How strongly I recommend it: 9/10

Greatest Lesson: Time is the most limited resource we have. Therefore the man who make decent money in a short time, is richer than the man who spend all his time making tons of money. Also read Tools of Titans.

Damn Good Advice

How strongly I recommend it: 9/10

Greatest Lesson: Stop waiting for a better project - the project in front of you have hidden greatness. If you think the project has no room for creativity, it is probably you who has no room for creativity. The more boring the more opportunity. Together with It's Not How Good You Are, It's How Good You Want to Be and Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite these book collectively form what I like to refer to as adman's guide to life.

Shoe Dog

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Every empire has a beginning, and your don't have to have it all figured out beforehand. Phil Knight didn't always know he wanted to build an empire, and he began selling chinese running shoes out of the trunk of his car. You don't think about Nike as a company with a humble beginning.

Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Customers first, then employees, then shareholders. This is the order Jack Ma prioritize his decision-making. He cannot make everyone happy, but the customer is crucial in every decision.

Moonwalking with Einstein

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: We remember events in relation to other memorable events. So don't wait to pack your years with memorable experiences, and you will live a long life. If you are looking for a practical guide I recommend Memo.

Amazon: The Everything Store

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: In all areas of business, you job to focus on how your decisions benefits the customer. Be ruthless about it. Many companies say they do that, but they really don't.

Total Recall

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Laser focus on a simple and tangible goal is key to success. Seems too simple, but that is the beauty of it, and Arnold proves this method in so many areas incl. fitness, acting, real estate, business and politics.

Thank You for Being Late

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Everyone needs someone to say they believe in them - be that person. The book is not nearly about this, but I keep coming back to this quote. This book can be read many, many times.

Personal MBA

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: How the world unfolds can largely be explained by fundamental, underlying principles (like the Pareto Principle) or what Charlie Munger call Mental Models. Also, the chapter on business models are invaluable.

Zero to One

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Most businesses fail on distribution because they focus on too many channels. Spend time investigating which channels works best for your business and product, and then double down on that.

Genghis Khan

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Luxury is evil, live simple and frugally. Luxury makes you idle, lazy and greedy. Also, learn how to apply winning strategies from one field, to dominate another.

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

How strongly I recommend it: 8/10

Greatest Lesson: Always be employed in something useful. This rock-star was one of the most productive people I have ever read about. Even though we are very little alike in person, I still try to learn from this great man.

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

How strongly I recommend it: 7/10

Greatest Lesson: Most history-altering events have been economic, political or religious events. Also, read the chapter on animals - that pushed me to become vegetarian.

The Art of Happiness

How strongly I recommend it: 7/10

Greatest Lesson: People become ugly when you are angry, and beautiful when you are happy. Think about how your view of the world affect the rest of the life. Introvert tip: An exercise I came up from this insight is to whisper I love you in my head when I meet new people. When I remember to do it, I usually hit it off with the person.

The Promise of Francis

How strongly I recommend it: 7/10

Greatest Lesson: Frugality is even more admirable if you hold great power. Francis is know as the Pope of the Slums because that is where he sees the biggest opportunity for doing good. Admirable spiritual leader.

The Art of Thinking Clearly

How strongly I recommend it: 7/10

Greatest Lesson: You cannot trust yourself, and your gut-feeling will in most cases be wrong (unless you are a real expert: Blink). This book together with Predictably Irrational will reveal your mind's blind spots.

Trust Me, I'm Lying

How strongly I recommend it: 7/10

Greatest Lesson: News are manufactured to have you believe something. So don't watch the news.

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

How strongly I recommend it: 6/10

Greatest Lesson: The South-Indian Monkey Trap: You drill a hole in a coconut just big enough for a monkey to squeeze it's hand into, and hollow it. Put some berries into the coconut, and tie it to a tree. When the monkey put it's hand into the coconut, it cannot get it's fist out due to the size of the hole. The hunters that are waiting can now easily trap the monkey. But if the monkey could reevaluate how valuable the rice was, it could save it's own life - but it is incapable of that. It is stuck in it's own desire, and suffers the consequences. Sounds familiar?

The Innovators

How strongly I recommend it: 6/10

Greatest Lesson: Innovation (almost) never happens to the single genius in the garage - it happens in groups.

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

How strongly I recommend it: 6/10

Greatest Lesson: If you have enough money to cover your basic needs, riches doesn't make you happy in the end - relationship does. This is the most heart-warming fiction-self-help-guide you will ever come across.

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